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OTTUMWA — A Cantril man faces up to 10 years in prison after his conviction on two counts of sexual exploitation of a minor.

The court sentenced Glenn Downing to an “indeterminate term of incarceration” of up to a decade for each count. The sentences will run concurrently. But the time behind bars is only part of the sentence. Since the convictions are Class C felonies, Downing will always be under the court’s scrutiny.

Under Iowa law, people convicted of a sexual offense that is a Class B or Class C felony serve a special sentence for life. That special sentence imposes terms similar to those required for parole. Violations of those terms are punishable by prison time — up to two years for the first violation and five years for subsequent revocations.

Downing was charged after a female Davis County student accused him of sending her photos of his genitals and putting his hand down her pants.

The Iowa Department of Corrections lists Downing as an inmate at the Iowa Medical and Classification Center, a required first stop for all male Iowa inmates.

In other area cases:

• Dennis Sandifer’s trial on charges of vehicular homicide and driving while intoxicated has been pushed back to Nov. 13, rather than beginning this week. Sandifer was charged in November 2018, months after an August crash that killed Brandon Pruet.

• One of three men facing charges in connection with a Jefferson County bank robbery apparently plans to plead guilty. The court has scheduled a plea hearing for Ethan Spray on Oct. 14.

Spray, Jordan Crawford and Ross Thornton each face charges in Jefferson County in a 2018 robbery of Pilot Grove Savings Bank in Packwood. Spray and Thornton also face charges in a bank robbery in Keokuk County.

Thornton is currently scheduled to go on trial in the Jefferson County case later this month. His trial in Keokuk County is scheduled to begin Dec. 10.

Matt Milner can be reached at mmilner@ottumwacourier.com and followed on Twitter @mwmilner

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Managing Editor

Matt Milner currently serves as the Courier's Managing Editor. Milner is a trained weather spotter and is usually outside if there are storms. He joined the Courier in 2002.

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